Just being present, paying complete attention to the person in a nonjudgmental way, is often the answer.

For yourself, being mindful of your own emotion is the first step to accepting your emotion.

According to the biosocial model, people with BPD frequently have differences in their neurotransmitter and neurological functioning.

Research has shown that they many have neurotransmitter issues that make them more emotional, aggressive, or reactive to stimuli – making them more prone to emotionally intense experiences.

Validation in DBT refers to offering the client verbal and nonverbal support and confirmation.

The emphasis on validation in DBT grew out of observations in the late 1970s that many clients experienced behavioral therapy as invalidating; this led to resistance and sometimes withdrawal from therapy.

Knowing the six levels of validation as identified by Marsha Linehan, Ph. Being present for yourself means acknowledging your internal experience and sitting with it rather than "running away" from it, avoiding it, or pushing it away. Even happiness or excitement can feel uncomfortable at times.

Often one of the reasons other people are uncomfortable with intense emotion is that they don't know what to say.

Validation is a way of communicating that the relationship is important and solid even when you disagree on issues.

Validation is the recognition and acceptance of another person's thoughts,feelings, sensations, and behaviors as understandable. Holding someone's hand when they are having a painful medical treatment, listening with your whole mind and doing nothing but listening to a child describe their day in first grade, and going to a friend's house at midnight to sit with her while she cries because a supposed friend told lies about her are all examples of being present.

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) combines cognitive and behavioral therapies with Eastern mindfulness practices. Linehan, DBT is useful in treating individuals with a wide variety of issues, including depression, anxiety, bipolar, self-injury, eating disorders, substance abuse, and relationship conflict.