The Short Version: To create a better match, Dating DNA provides compatibility scores that help users gauge the likelihood of potential matches being a good fit.Compatibility is compiled using each member’s unique 9-digit code, like DNA, based on responses to an extensive sign-up survey.Gene Partner's biological matching method is designed as a harmonizing service for matchmakers and online dating sites.

dating site dna matching-7

This is a new dating trend, could be the modern version of matching birth astro charts before deciding on life partner.

Termed 'DNA Dating', practice is being encouraged by a DNA matchmaking website that may see the end of the compatibility test.

Virtual reality, wearable technology and DNA could be future of dating according to a student report from Imperial College Business School.

Students from the MSc Management programme were commissioned by relationship website e uk to produce a report on what online dating and relationships could look like by 2040.

This would make dating a far more efficient and less time consuming process.

A full sensory virtual date would be exactly like a real one, for example a person could hold someone’s hand and even smell their fragrance – but from the comfort of their own home.Users can even set a compatibility threshold and lock out users who don’t make the cut as an added level of security.And Dating DNA has been doing all of that for free on Apple devices since 2008.In January 2007, Steve Jobs took the stage at the Moscone Center in San Francisco and introduced the world to the first i Phone saying, “Today, Apple is going to reinvent the phone.” Six months later, the first i Phone was released and its unique touch interface and full web browser became the new standard for how users would interact with mobile devices.After much outcry, the App Store landed a year later as an easy solution for users to browse and install non-native applications on their i Phones.The students compiled a business report based on analysis of how people’s lifestyle habits have evolved over the past 100 years, drawing on interviews with experts across the fields of anthropology, sociology, technology and biomedicine.