It is hard to imagine today, but in the early 1960’s having an electric guitar in your home was rare.In fact, it was likely that your parents were steering you in the direction of accordion lessons. The Beatles – and of course others – stopped all that.

and its family was a very popular archtop guitar, available in one way or another for nearly a decade.

Sears sold a bunch, and it pretty much ruled the roost of f-hole acoustics.

EKO was at the forefront, and within 2 years they were shipping over 10,000 electric guitars to USA per year.

For most North American kids, including myself, their first guitar was an EKO or some Japanese import. these were all too expensive for our parents to buy for us.

Some of the most collectible vintage Martin flat tops include the Dreadnoughts from the 1930s, but any 12 or 14-fret steel-string models from the mid-1920s until the mid-1940s will bring a good price.

The best part about collecting Martin guitars is that the company has made it so easy—vintage Martin guitars from 1898 to the present are easy to date because each instrument has an individual serial number. Gretsch competed with both companies via its line of Synchromatics, which had a cat’s-eye sound hole (Gibson and others went with more traditional f-holes).

With the approach of World War II, increasing numbers of people wanted radios not just for entertainment, but also to receive updates on the war's progress, according to contemporary company sales analyses.

During World War II, Sears introduced the Silvertone radio antenna with "stratobeam reception." And to help power the radios, Sears sold Silvertone wind generators.

The Airline Guitars were sold through Montgomery Ward.