See: contributions: Tan CO conceived and designed the study, was involved in data collection, analysed and interpreted data, drafted and revised the manuscript, gave approval for the final manuscript, and agrees to be accountable for all aspects, accuracy and integrity of the work involved; Weinberg L and Story DA assisted in conceptualisation and design of the study, was involved in data collection, analysed and interpreted data, revised the manuscript, gave approval for the final manuscript, and agrees to be accountable for all aspects, accuracy and integrity of the work involved; Mc Nicol L assisted in design of the study, revised the manuscript, gave approval for the final manuscript, and agrees to be accountable for all aspects, accuracy and integrity of the work involved.

Institutional review board statement: This study was approved by the Austin Health Human Research and Ethics Committee (H2012/04776) and was carried out in compliance with the Helsinki Declaration on research involving human participants.

Open-Access: This article is an open-access article which was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers.

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If you're shopping for allergy medication, we'll assume your eyes are itchy, your nose is running, and you can't stop sneezing.

But if you can still breathe through your nose, proceed to Step 2.

Actually it was an honour to be asked to speak and it was thrilling to see so many students giving up an evening to come and listen to me blather away about ECGs.

It is nice to know that the future of paramedicine is in the hands of such enthusiastic and dedicated people. Specifically about the things that I was never taught about ECGs; those few little things that can make the difference between a good outcome for a patient and a poor outcome. First of all, the importance of proportionality in ECGs.

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Please set your browser to accept cookies to continue.Some ECGs are very subtle – think of the electro-cardiographically silent high lateral infarct where depression in the inferior leads is the first, or only, sign that something is amiss.Or the posterior infarct, where in the standard 12 leads there will be no elevation at all, just depression in anterior leads, and only a tiny amount of elevation in the posterior leads.We are given a set of (somewhat arbitrary) rules that state there must be ST elevation of 2mm in V1 & V2 or greater than 1mm in other leads.The trouble with this is that it does not hold true for all situations.We report a case of severe rhabdomyolysis, which resulted from quetiapine use in a patient who was on it for the treatment of bipolar disorder for about 8 months.